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Expanding Collaboration Between Disparate Arts

  Sonoma County sculptor Bruce Johnson is known for his massive redwood and metal structures.

But he has also been central to some unexpected collaborations with artists from quite different fields. 

Sculptor Bruce Johnson’s name for his Poetry House provided a parallel for Elizabeth Herron’s long poem, The Poet’s House.  But she says the finished space was also rich in inspiration.

Choreographer Nancy Lyons says she and her colleagues in the SoCo Dance Theater also drew inspiration from Johnson’s work—in a very tactile way.

The events bringing all this together are billed as "from the Poetry House and Into the Heartwood," happening Saturday, July 15  and 4 and 7:30 pm and Sunday, July 16 at 4 pm, all at the Sebastopol Center for the Arts. You can find more details here.

In May, 2015, KRCB broadcast this North Bay Report on the preparations for Bruce Johnson's "Roots 101" exhibit at the Luther Burbank Center.

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