Tags >> water
May 25
2009

Bohemia Ranch

Posted by Bruce Robinson in wildlife , West County , water , trees , timber , resources , recreation , parks , open space , fish , environment , conservation

Bruce Robinson

A little-seen watershed near Occidental, informally known as Waterfall Park, may be moving toward actually becoming a real park.

 

Conservation consultant David Katz, who is representing the property owner in talks with the Sonoma County Ag and Open Space District, says that while the waterfall there may be the most unusual aspect of Bohemia Ranch, it's really just part of a larger array of natural resources.

 

There is an element of urgency in the renewed effort to see Bohemia Ranch acquired by the county, not just because the property is already legally allowed to host six future homesites, but also, David Katz adds, because a long-term permit for logging is also in place there.

 As a representative of the current owner of Bohemia Ranch, Katz has also developed a website to market it, which features photographs and a video of the property.

The Community Clean Water Institute says about this property:

The property is on Bohemian Hwy. about four miles from Occidental and
fourteen miles from Santa Rosa. Most of the site is moderate to steep
sloping ridges covered with forest or grassy meadows. The ranch is drained
by three creeks that flow into Dutch Bill Creek, which is just off the
property. The famed waterfall is on lower Duvoul Creek.

Over the past 8 years extensive clean-up and restoration work has occurred
on the ranch. All debris has been removed, roads re-graded and resurfaced,
new roads developed, numerous erosion sites repaired, extensive biologic
evaluation and documentation accomplished, and many new water sources
developed.

A conservation easement on the ranch is held by the Sonoma Land Trust, but
the possibility of subdivision into six separate home sites still exists on
the ranch.

The property is 862 acres, with about 400 acres in fir forest with some
redwoods. The forest has an approved Nonindustrial Timber Management Plan in place, which means that it can be commercially harvested without additional approvals. As a result of quantifying this timber resource a great
opportunity exists to sell carbon credits to raise funds for supporting the
proposed park while simultaneously preventing any further cutting of trees.

The creeks that drain Bohemia Ranch flow directly into Dutch Bill Creek at
the very heart of its watershed. Bohemia Ranch cover approximately 17% of
the entire watershed of Dutch Bill Creek. Dutch Bill creek supports
federally listed endangered species coho salmon and threatened steelhead and has been the focus of considerable restoration expenditures over the past
few years.

The Dutch Bill Creek Watershed Council, the Watershed Institute at
Occidental Arts and Ecology Center, Westminster Woods, and the Goldridge
Resource Conservation District have supplied leadership in implementing
restoration activities on the creek. The Sonoma County Water Agency, CA
Dept. of Fish and Game, NOAA Fisheries, and the University of California
have been actively engaged in restoration on Dutch Bill Creek. Many other
organizations are also involved and are supporting the restoration work on
the creek. All of these organizations support protecting the watershed by
protecting Bohemia Ranch.

 

 

Apr 26
2009

Rivers of a Lost Coast

Posted by Bruce Robinson in water , tourism , Russian River , resources , recreation , policy , ocean , media , history , fish , environment , coast

Bruce Robinson

The rise and surprisingly rapid fall of fly fishing on the Russian and other northern California rivers is told in a new documentary film, Rivers of a Lost Coast.

As a boy, Justin Coupe, co-director of Rivers of a Lost Coast, was taught fly fishing by his father, a lifelong angler.   So after finishing college, with an eye toward making a film about that subculture, he returned to the Russian and other northern California rivers to reacquaint himself with his subject. Doing so, he says, reaffirmed his determination to capture this slice of regional history while the first-person participants were still on hand to talk about it.

 

  

 

One of the unexpected stories within Rivers of A Lost Coast involves the long and bitter rivalry between two of the region's most accomplished fishermen, Bill Schaadt left) and Tom Linden.

 See the trailer for Rivers of a Lost Coast:

[video:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wmo_q6fh2gw 400x400] 

Apr 14
2009

John Muir

Posted by Bruce Robinson in wildlife , water , trees , students , speaker , sacred , resources , recreation , policy , parks , Ideas , history , Health , events , environment , education , conservation , author

Bruce Robinson

 John Muir (right) died 95 years ago, but he still speaks to modern day California. And not just through his writings.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Retired Methodist minister Don Baldwin (seen here in character) has embraced the role of ground-breaking environmentalist John Muir in public appearances throughout northern California and beyond.

 


         

 Even after studying biographies and Muir's own extensive writings, Don Baldwin remains amazed by the early environmentalist's ability to survive handily in the wilderness with the most minimal supplies.

 

 

 

 

 Despite his capacity for extended solo sojourns,  Baldwin reports that Muir was also a highly social person, when he came back down from the mountains.

 

 

 "John Muir" will be appearing twice in Sonoma County on Sunday, April 19th, first at the 11 am service at the Unitarian Universalist congregation in Santa Rosa  and at 2 pm in Sebastopol for the annual Earth Elders event (left) at Luther Burbank's historic Gold Ridge Farm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mar 30
2009

The Landfill's Future

Posted by Bruce Robinson in water , waste , toxic , technology , speaker , Sonoma , Sebastopol , Santa Rosa , resources , public safety , policy , planning , Petaluma , nonprofit orgs , news , Health , government , events , environment , economy , design , conservation , community , climate change , chemicals , carbon , business , alternative energy , agriculture

Bruce Robinson

 Sonoma County's main dump, seen from the air at left,  has been closed since 2005, but its future continues to be hotly debated.

 

           

Operating a landfill anywhere in northern California is a difficult prospect in today's regulatory climate, observes Assemblyman Wes Chesbro, and even a well-funded private company must surmount those obstacles.

A proposed Materials Recovery Facility (MRF) for Sonoma County could eventually be able to sort out and reuse as much as 90% of the region's waste stream. Alan Strachan, one of the backers of that project, suggests that through composting or other processes, even most of the remaining 10% could someday be reused.

Longtime recycling advocate Mike Anderson is one of many voices taking up the call for setting a goal of zero waste.

 

 The March 30th forum on the future of the Sonoma County landfill was co-hosted by the Climate Protection Campaign and the  Leadership Institute on Ecology nd the Economy.

The entire public forum was recorded and will be broadcast at the following times on Community Media Channel 26 in Santa Rosa:

Monday, March 30 (LIVE) 8am
Wednesday, April 1st  5pm
Thursday, April 2nd 12pm
Friday, April 3rd  5pm
Saturday, April 4th  6am
Sunday, April 5th 5pm
Monday, April 6th  8am
Wednesday, April 8th 5pm
Thursday, April 9th  12pm
Friday, April 10th 5pm
Saturday, April 11th 6am
Sunday, April 12th 5pm

 More information and background about Ecoleader .

To learn more about the Landfill.

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