Tags >> food
Aug 16
2009

Invasive Snails

Posted by Bruce Robinson in wildlife , water , Science , research , ocean , Marin , food , fish , environment , coast , California , animals

Bruce Robinson

A complex interaction between native crabs and oysters and invasive Atlantic snails (seen at left)  is playing out beneath the waters of Tomales Bay.

 Dr. David Kimbro has studied the predatory effects of invasive Atlantic snails on native Olympia oysters in Tomales Bay. He explains how they arrived there more than a century ago.

 

 

There also native Pacific snails in Tomales Bay, but unlike their invasive (or as scientists say "introduced") Atlantic cousins (right), the local snails have learned how to safely coexist with the snail-eating red rock crabs (below). UC Davis biologist Ted Grosholtz explains.

 

The smaller, green European crab, another introduced species in Tomales Bay, can handle the less salty water in the shallow portions of the bay, but because they will eat a wider variety of foods, these crabs have not developed the same skills for preying on snails that the red rock crabs display.

 

Aug 03
2009

Prenatal Pollution

Posted by Bruce Robinson in youth , water , toxic , technology , speaker , Science , public safety , policy , nonprofit orgs , news , medicine , Marin , legislation , healthcare , Health , government , food , families , environment , education , drugs , disability , corporate responsibiliyt , Congress , children , chemicals , activism

Bruce Robinson

 

Exposure to toxic chemicals in our environment begins early in life--even before birth.

  Ken Cook, President and co-founder of the Environmental Working Group, is a strong proponent for a Kids-Safe Chemical Act, to reduce children's exposure to toxics in the environment.

  

 Additional online resources from the Environmental Working Group  include the Shopper's Guide to Pesticides, and their Cosmetic Saftety database.

Click here to view Ken Cook's 20-minute video summary presentation on the 10 Americans  study.

The Environmental Working Group is also pressing for the creation of a human "toxome," similar to the genetic map known as the human genome, to identify where and how toxic chemicals affect the body's healthy biological processes.

 

 

Jul 09
2009

Beer

Posted by Bruce Robinson in wine , Science , history , Health , food , author

Bruce Robinson

  

 Beer is harder to make than wine, and better for you as well, according to a professor of brewing science.

 

Charles Bamforth chairs the Department of  Food Science & Technology at the  University of California, Davis, where he is also the a Professor of Brewing Science. A native Englishman, he also worked previously as a quality control manager for Bass Ale. But he still has a high regard for the light American lagers that are often disparaged by beer drinkers who prefer a heartier brew.

The so-called "beer belly" is another unjust and disparaging characterization that demeans the noble beverage. Bamforth explains why in the clip audio below.

 

 Bamforth's  recent book  Grape Vs. Grain compares the history, making, and health benefits of beer and wine.

 

Jul 08
2009

Urban Permaculture

Posted by Bruce Robinson in volunteer , teens , seniors , resources , parks , nonprofit orgs , Ideas , food , families , environment , education , conservation , community engagement , climate change , children , carbon , agriculture , activism

Bruce Robinson

Permaculture - an idea that began around sustainable agriculture - is moving into the urban environment.

  You can also learn more about this subject at the Oakland-based Urban Permaculture Guild.

Dave Henson, Executive Director of the Occidental Arts and Ecology Center (right), explains that interest in permaculture arose in part in response to the widespread dominance of "monoculture," or large-scale farming of a single crop.

One of the enduring examples of crop integration is indigenous to Mexico and the American southwest, and known colloquially as the "three sisters."